"Deep Water"
#1
My husband and I watched this last week. At first, he thought it was going to be one of those corny sailing movies like "Wind." (I admit the romantic plot was really silly, and according to reviews, nothing like the real-life romance.)

But husband consented to watch the beginning, and by the end of the movie, I said, "You're still here." (He had said he would leave after the beginning to go do something.)

He admitted it was a good documentary.

It isn't just about sailing, although that's mainly why I got it. It is, however, a scary look at man's psyche.

Spoiler :
Spoiler: It was interesting to me that Donald Crowhurst and Bernard Montessier both decided not to go home again, but they decided to do different things instead.

I like to think I'm more of the Moitessier type. But I do admire Crowhurst for his inventions, his bravery (although husband said, "He was an idiot to set sail without thorough preparation," which is true. Part of being a good sailor is knowing how and when to fit your boat. And to do a good shakedown sail before making long distance voyages.), and just because.

There's a book which I got, in addition to the movie: _The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst_. I didn't appreciate the snideness of the authors, but I did appreciate that they included a lot of Crowhurst's journal entries. Fascinating man.

Moitessier is as well.

Robin Knox-Johnston, well we all know what happened to him! I admire him too, but for different reasons.
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#2
I never heard of that movie. Thank for posting about it. The photo at IMDB tells me I better be ready for some thrilling scenes. I just put it into my Netflix queue.
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#3
Oh, be careful watching it, Andrew! I forgot to mention that it made me cry!
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#4
That is one powerful story. And, of course, not what I expected.

Spoiler :
I was trying to figure out why he would take an untested boat. The only thing I come up with is he was so focused on all the innovations he forgot about proven reliability.

I can't remember the name of the guy who won. But I remember them saying a 32 foot ketch. Can you imagine being tossed around in a boat that size on those waves.

BTW, here's how to hide a spoiler: http://www.fallberry.com/forum/thread-43.html
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#5
(01-11-2012, 02:16 PM)Andrew Wrote: That is one powerful story. And, of course, not what I expected.

BTW, here's how to hide a spoiler: http://www.fallberry.com/forum/thread-43.html

Ah!!! THANKS for the tip on how to hide a spoiler. That's a nice feature! Smile
Spoiler :
Robin Knox-Johnston was the winner.

Yeah, I think he was probably manic depressive. He probably went into it manic, and of course, came out of it depressed. Unhappy It's such a tragic story.

I can't help but think Bernard Moitessier was the same way. To almost win, and yet to turn around and want to go around the world yet again. I think, unlike Donald Crowhurst, he found himself out there. On second thought, maybe both of them found themselves. Donald just didn't like what he found. Unhappy

Both men, tragic. And ahhh, did it not make you cry?

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#6
Reading about Bernard Moitessier a little on the web, it looks like he might have written a book about his long sailing experience. Have you read anything of his?
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#7
(01-26-2012, 05:39 PM)Andrew Wrote: Reading about Bernard Moitessier a little on the web, it looks like he might have written a book about his long sailing experience. Have you read anything of his?

No, not yet, but it's definitely on my queue. Speaking of sailing biographies, another marvelous sailing bio is by Sharon Sites Adams called Pacific Lady. I wish someone would make a documentary about her. Maybe there is one, but if so, I haven't found it.

If you read Moitessier's bio, do let us know how it was.
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#8
Interestingly, a 16-year-old Australian girl sailed around the world non-stop and unassisted in a 34 foot boat. I guess as time goes by, people get bolder and more people try.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/15...77445.html
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#9
(01-29-2012, 04:38 PM)Andrew Wrote: Interestingly, a 16-year-old Australian girl sailed around the world non-stop and unassisted in a 34 foot boat. I guess as time goes by, people get bolder and more people try.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/15...77445.html

Yup! She is famous in sailing circles.

She almost died though when tanker nearly ran her over, while she was sleeping.

I ended up getting yet another book about this race. It's called A Voyage for Madmen. Absolutely fascinating. It's clear that everyone who went on this race was just a bit slightly mad. Smile

And it's just amazing to me all the weird coincidences.

Just weird coincidences. It really makes me think that everything we do is so connected. Even people whom one doesn't even know, can be affected by our decisions. It's a bit creepy. And yet. . . amazing!
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#10
(02-21-2012, 05:25 AM)Aiona Wrote: She almost died though when tanker nearly ran her over, while she was sleeping.

I read about that, and it appears this happened before her voyage. Either that or it caused her to abort her first attempt, because her mast was broken. The collision, though, gave her a wakeup call about some things she had overlooked. She had only set two of her three collision avoidance alarms, because she hadn't used a checklist. And she had no plan in place for fatigue management. Perhaps this collision helped her in the long run.
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