Lectures on DVD
#11
Oh my. But, not surprised really.
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#12
(06-17-2012, 12:00 PM)Andrew Wrote: there were experiments where children were purposely denied language, but did have human contact. And the result was they either could not acquire language, or they were very limited at it. I think this was mentioned in the lecture, but I'd have to watch again to make sure.

This certainly is true for songbirds. One of my professors at the U. of I. has made his life's work on defining the window of neurobiological changes that occur during the time in which songbirds transition to not being able to acquire their mating songs.

http://www.life.illinois.edu/clayton/Home.html

His ultimate goal, of course, is to find some biochemical correlation with humans.

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#13
Thanks for the link about the birds. Very interesting. I seem to have missed some of your messages before.
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#14
I wrote out a rather long reply about colors and some such, and got force-closed out by my tablet. Which is just as well. I ended up spending an hour editing my book instead. I swear, there's a Lag Goddess who bumps people off if they're doing something they're not supposed to.

Anyway, I wanted to post a little update about my oldest son's language skills. He's better at discerning blue from green now, but he has trouble with blue-greens. He also has trouble with dark oranges versus reds. And for a while he was saying "rellow" instead of "yellow," but it's funny how he seems to have picked up an accent from my Dad (Chinese-Thai) even though he wasn't with them very long. Like Venus? One time he was pointing in the sky and he kept saying "Penis!" I was mortified, until I figured out he was mixing up V's B's and P's... as many Filipinos (such as my mom) do. He has since stopped doing that. Whew!

Also it's really funny seeing his learning process with language. We were picking pecans a few weeks ago, and I showed him how not to pick the broken ones. While we were outside, I asked him, "Did you pick a broken one?" (It looked broken from where I was standing.) And he goes, "No, Mommy, it's still fixed."

And he was right. It wasn't broken. But who "fixed" it? Wink





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#15
Interesting to talk with children, because we learn how much we take for granted. If unbroken or "not broken" are not words/phrases he has been taught, the logical choice might be "fixed." Well, assuming he has seen something that was broken and then fixed.
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#16

(12-25-2012, 01:31 PM)Andrew Wrote: Well, assuming he has seen something that was broken and then fixed.

Unfortunately, he's definitely seen a lot of stuff broken and fixed in our household! Smile
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#17
(12-25-2012, 04:16 PM)Aiona Wrote: Unfortunately, he's definitely seen a lot of stuff broken and fixed in our household! Smile

Aha, so it seems he has hands-on experience with this.
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